SECTION 1 REVIEW

Section 1 Review


Introduction


Knowledge and Skills (Objective): The student recognizes the value of legal and responsible reduced-risk driving practices and accepts driving as a privilege with responsibilities, obligations, and potential consequences.


A- Beginning Driver


Most people are not bad drivers all the time. However, no one doubts that many drivers have some bad habits. Bad habits can ultimately lead to accidents. According to the National Safety Council, in 1997 there were 43,200 deaths in the U.S. due to motor-vehicle accidents. Our curriculum provides a program which helps beginning drivers to identify and correct their driving deficiencies.


Immaturity behind the wheel can lead to improper braking, over reacting, over-steering, over compensating in a skid situation, and more. In time, an experienced driver will adjust his/her driving according to various weather and road conditions, such as fog, rain, snow, and traffic. Beginning drivers are especially vulnerable to distractions in the vehicle such as cell phone use, music, smoking, and other passengers in the car.


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A- Beginning Driver


Maturity behind-the-wheel comes with time. Just like many other things, the more you practice driving, the better you become. Learning to drive safely takes time, effort and focus. For beginning drivers their lack of skill and attention to detail is a direct result of their inexperience. It is important to begin driving with good habits and the desire to work on improving skills constantly.


People, vehicles, and roadways are all part of the Highway Transportation System (HTS). The HTS is a complex system designed to move people and things safely and efficiently from one place to another.


Simple neighborhood lanes, complex superhighways, and every kind of street in between make up approximately 4 million miles of roadway that link every state, county, city, and town in America. Everyday these roads are traveled by more than 180 million people driving, riding, or walking. Spread out evenly, that is over 45 people per mile. Of course, some roads are traveled more heavily than others. With so much traffic in so little space traveling at speeds of up to 75 miles per hour, you might expect a few collisions - and you will find them.


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A- Beginning Driver (Continued)


In a given year, any driver stands a 1 in 9 chance of being in a collision. A safe driver must interact with various types of drivers, in many types of vehicles, on different types of roadways, and do so without collisions, traffic violations or near misses.


The HTS is regulated jointly by federal, state, and local governments. The federal government sets minimum standards by which all state and local governments must abide. The state and local governments that follow these guidelines receive federal funding to maintain certain aspects of the HTS. Federal laws also establish state rights regarding driver and roadway safety. Some examples of federal laws are:



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A- Beginning Driver


This particular segment provides novice drivers with the foundation of knowledge, understanding, skills, and experiences necessary to continue the life-long learning process of reduced-risk driving. This course is designed to help you qualify for a Texas Driver License and to help you become a safe driver. The information is not intended to be an official, legal reference to Texas traffic laws. It is intended only to explain those laws and driving practices and procedures which you need most often when driving in Texas.


If you have a court case or other reason to know the actual language of the traffic laws, refer to the Texas Transportation Code and criminal laws in the Texas Penal Code. All driver handbooks are distributed by your local Driver License Office(s) or can be viewed on the DPS website in PDF format. Click here to download the latest copy. Do not disregard this handbook. Study it for reference and stay up-to-date on the information it contains. To stay up-to-date with all law changes, get a new copy every two years after the Texas Legislature has met.


If you need additional information, contact your local Driver License Office or visit www.txdps.state.tx.us. Appendix C of the Texas handbook can help you locate a driver license office in your area.


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B - Responsible Decision Making


Innovations in highway design are making modern roadways safer than ever. Today’s high speed roadways separate traffic moving in opposite directions with a wide median—a concrete or grassy structure in between the lanes. It is not uncommon for newly constructed highways to include rumble strips along the outer boundary of the lane.


These ridges in the pavement will cause a vehicle’s tires to make a loud “rumbling” noise and cause the whole vehicle to vibrate if the driver drifts to the edge of the road. Reflective paints and nodes are now used to separate lanes of traffic because they are easy to see during both day and night.


Highways and interstates will, by design, have a shoulder - a strip of land along the roadway that may be paved or consist of gravel or dirt. Shoulders should be engineered to support the weight of an automobile, leaving a place for drivers to stop in an emergency. They are not, however, designed to support extensive driving. Other safety features found on highways may include guard rails, street lights and electronic notification signs.


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Two primary contributors are speeding and driving while intoxicated (DWI)

B - Responsible Decision Making (Continued)


These features, as well as vehicle safety technologies, are in place to protect drivers from the dangers inherent in driving. However, the number one cause of collisions is driver error.


Traffic safety is the primary responsibility of all highway users. You can carry out this responsibility by practicing safe and courteous driving behavior. Texas has a highway system that is considered to be one of the most extensive systems in the United States. Annually, Texas drivers will log over 187 billion miles. In recent years, the state of Texas has seen the numbers of traffic fatalities increase. Two primary contributors to this increase are speeding and driving while intoxicated (DWI). Any driver in the United States can reduce fatalities and injuries by simple acts such as using safety belts. If we all contribute to responsible driving, we can drastically decrease highway fatalities. It begins with YOU.


Make a personal commitment today to carefully pay attention to the content of this course and to study the Texas Driver Handbook. Do this to develop the skills and knowledge that you need to become a safe driver. Basic knowledge of traffic laws provides a driver with the foundation to formulate informed, legal, and responsible decisions to reduce risk.


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C - The Privilege of Driving

Vehicles were invented by the great minds of people working together over many nations. When the first vehicles were produced, they were expensive. Many people were content to stay with their current means of transportation (horse and carriage), but eventually the technology improved and the price of vehicles became more reasonable. Over time, vehicles became the ideal way to travel. When this occurred, a new problem arose - vehicles hitting one another and causing injury or death to passengers.


Consider this: Owning a vehicle is a right. Traveling on public roads is a right. As an individual who owns the road (public domain), you have an inherent claim to access it. Public roads are in the public domain, so the public has the right to use them. Therefore, just as with parks, sidewalks or other public domain, your use of them is constrained by how that use may affect the rights of others to use them. Therefore, driving a vehicle is a privilege given to those who have demonstrated the ability to drive in a matter that is safe for all roadway users.


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C - The Privilege of Driving (Continued)


If a roadway user has not demonstrated the ability to safely operate a vehicle, they will not have the privilege to drive on Texas roadways.


Traffic laws exist today to protect everyone that uses Texas roadways. Operating a motor vehicle in Texas is a privilege, not a right. If this privilege is abused it may result in driver license suspension or revocation. Always obey traffic laws. This includes all signs, signals and markings. Under all circumstances, you must obey officers of the law.


Driving is a privilege with inherent risks, responsibilities, and obligations, as well as potentially severe consequences. Driving safely requires knowledge, understanding and application of legal and responsible reduced-risk driving practices.


D - Consequences

Officers of the law exist to protect citizens. This includes watching for and ticketing those who break traffic laws. When these laws are broken, privileges to drive on Texas roads can and will be taken away. Depending on the severity of the offense, your license may be revoked or suspended for a long time.


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D - Consequences (Continued)


Drunk Driving - The consequences of drunk driving are far reaching. The effects of driving while intoxicated not only affect the individual involved but others as well. Passengers in the vehicle and pedestrians can be physically and emotionally harmed, not to mention the family and friends of those involved. Penalties can haunt the driver involved for many years and the cost of such citations can be enormous!

Reckless Driving - One of the most common driving offenses is reckless driving. Reckless driving usually results in a misdemeanor criminal or traffic offense. The most common acts associated with reckless driving are speeding, tailgating, weaving in and out through traffic, illegal overtaking or disregarding traffic, signs and signals. The consequences can be high if convicted of this offense. One of the most common causes of reckless driving is road rage.


Seat Belts - Not wearing a seat belt can result in serious injury or death. When a driver is not wearing a seat belt and a collision occurs, the driver flies free until stopped by impact on the steering column or windshield.


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D - Consequences (Continued)


If you are wearing a seat belt, it will give you more of a stopping distance because it will stretch. Without a seat belt, this stopping distance is estimated to be around 1/5 of that with a seat belt, which causes the impact force to be about 5 times as great.


Always consider the consequences of your actions before making a decision on the road. The roadway is fast-moving! Be aware of others around you but do not be distracted by them. Make your own decisions. Always wear a seat belt. Do not drink and drive. Recognize the value of legal and responsible reduced-risk driving practices. Accept driving as a privilege with responsibilities, obligations, and potential consequences.


Your License to Drive


Knowledge and Skills (Objective): The student reduces risk and accepts driving as a privilege by legally and responsibly possessing a driver license, registering and having a current inspection on a motor vehicle, and obeying the Safety Responsibility Act.


A - Texas Drivers License and Permit


Instruction Permit - The instruction permit is used for the purpose of permitting the student driver to legally practice behind-the-wheel when accompanied by a licensed driver.


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Graduated

Driver

Licensing

A - Texas Drivers License and Permit (Continued)


Individuals who are under the age of 25 are required to successfully complete an approved driver education course. For more information on licensing requirements for applicants who are under the age of 25, visit the DPS website at www.dps.texas.gov.


To obtain your permit, you need to be at least 15 years old (if you are in driver education). A $16.00 fee will be required. This permit is valid until your next birthday plus one year. It must be renewed as a photo-type license at regular fees after it has expired, or when the drive test is passed and restrictions removed.


Graduated Driver License - The Texas Graduated Driver License Program was implemented on January 1st, 2002.


Phase One: Applicants under age 18 must hold an instruction permit or hardship license for a minimum of six months prior to issuance of a provisional Class A, B, or C driver license. Under the GDL program, there is no minimum time that a person must hold a restricted motorcycle or moped license before they can apply for a Class M license.


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Graduated

Driver

Licensing

Graduated Driver License (Continued)


Phase one does not apply to Class M or hardship license holders. The instruction permit must remain valid during the mandatory six-month period to meet this regulation.


Phase Two: Phase Two restricts the driving privileges of persons under 18 years of age during the six-month period following the issuance of an original Class A, B, or C driver license (Provisional License). These persons may not operate a motor vehicle with more than one passenger in the vehicle under the age of 21 who is not a family member.


In addition, they may not operate a motor vehicle between midnight and 5:00 a.m. unless the operation of the vehicle is necessary for the operator to attend or participate in employment or a school-related activity or because of a medical emergency. The license restriction will state, “TRC 545.424 applies until mm/dd/yy”. Applicants 15 years of age presenting an out-of-state instruction permit will be issued a Texas instruction permit which must be held for six months from the date of issuance before becoming eligible for Phase Two.


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Graduated Driver License (Continued)


Applicants at least 16 years of age and less than 18 years old who present a valid out-of-state instruction permit or out-of-state driver license will be issued a Phase Two provisional GDL with passenger and time restrictions for the first six months of operation of a motor vehicle in Texas.

Drivers License - An application form may be obtained at your nearest Driver License Office. The application must be filled out in person. You will need to give your full name, identification documents, physical description, social security card (or other proof of social security number), thumbprints, and residence address.


In addition, you will need to provide your county of residence, as well as medical status and background on the application form. All out-of-state driver licenses must be surrendered at the time of application. A complete record of your examination will be recorded on your application and sent to the Department headquarters where it becomes part of your permanent driving record. All convictions for moving traffic violations that occur will also be recorded on this record (including out-of-state records of convictions).


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Drivers License (Continued)


An application for the original driver license must be accompanied by evidence of financial responsibility (insurance), that must be in at least the minimum amount required by the Act, and must cover all motor vehicles that the driver owns and for which the applicant is required to maintain financial responsibility.


The license exam consists of three parts: The knowledge test, the vision test, and the driving skills test.

The Knowledge Test


The answers to this test can be found on the Texas Driver Handbook. To pass you need to achieve a grade of 70% or better. An oral test may be arranged if needed. If you do not pass the knowledge and driving tests on the date of your first application, your incomplete application will be retained in the Drivers License office for 90 days. After 90 days or three exam failures a new application and fee will be required.


The Vision Test


Your vision also needs to be tested. If you do not do well on this test, you might be required to wear corrective lenses while you are behind-the-wheel. In many cases, this will dramatically improve your vision and increase the safety of your driving.


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The Driving Skills Test


After the Knowledge and Vision tests have been passed, and you have proven evidence of liability insurance covering the vehicle, you are eligible to take your driving skills test. The type of vehicle you take your test in must match that of the test you are taking. The vehicle must have a valid inspection certificate attached and must pass inspection by the Driver License trooper/examiner before the test is given.


During the driving skills test, you will not be asked to do anything illegal. You must follow the instructions of the examiner, and not speak to the examiner unless asked a question. If you do not have the privilege to legally drive in Texas, a licensed driver should drive your vehicle to the test area. Your application will not be approved if you violate the law, refuse to follow instructions, drive dangerously, have a collision, or have more than 30 points deducted on the driving test.



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The Driving Skills Test (Continued)


In addition, you might be graded on parallel parking, quick stops, backing, stop signs (or signals), use of the clutch, general observance, turns, right-of-way, passing, following, and posture.


After you complete the test, the examiner will tell you how well you performed, as well as ways you can correct any errors. You will be given a grade sheet of your test. If you do not pass the test, you will be told which areas to practice in order to improve your driving skills and when you may return to attempt the exam again. If you pass the test, your photo will be taken and you will be given a receipt that may be used as a temporary license for up to 60 days.


You receive your permanent license in the mail from the DPS. Always carry your license with you when driving. You will need to show your license upon request to any peace officer, sheriff, constable, judge, justice of the peace, state trooper, or anyone with whom you are involved in a crash.


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Renewing Your License


To renew your license, you must go in person to any Texas Driver License office. In some cases, you might be eligible to renew by alternate means. To find out if you are eligible for these options, go to www.txdps.state.tx.us or call 866-DL-RENEW.


A change of name or address must be reported to DPS within 30 days. A license expiring in less than 12 months, or in less than 30 days for a provisional license, should be renewed not duplicated.


B - License Types, Restrictions and Endorsements


The types of Texas Driver Licenses include: Instruction Permit, Provisional License, Classified Driver License, and Commercial Driver License (CDL).


Class A Driver License - A Class A driver license permits a person to drive:



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Class A and B Driver License

Class A Driver License (Continued)


A Class A driver license does not permit a person to drive a motorcycle or moped.


Minimum Age / Fee* / Expiration - 18 or older (Applicants 18 to 24 are required to successfully complete an approved driver education course.) / $24 for license + $1 fee = $25 / Six years 17 with completion of an approved driver education course or approval of a minor restricted driver license (MRDL) / $15 for license + $1 fee = $16 / On applicant’s next birthday.


A $1 administrative fee is included in most fees. However, if you are completing multiple transactions at the same time either in-person or online then you will only be charged the $1 administrative fee once. A $1 administrative fee is not charged for transactions made through the mail.


Class B Driver License


A Class B driver license permits a person to drive:


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Class B and C Driver License

Class B Driver License (Continued)


A Class B driver license does not permit a person to drive a motorcycle or moped.


Minimum Age / Fee* / Expiration - 18 or older (Applicants 18 to 24 are required to successfully complete an approved driver education course.) / $24 for license + $1 fee = $25 / Six years 17 with completion of an approved driver education course or approval of a minor restricted driver license (MRDL) / $15 for license + $1 fee = $16 / On applicant’s next birthday.


A $1 administrative fee is included in most fees. However, if you are completing multiple transactions at the same time either in-person or online then you will only be charged the $1 administrative fee once. A $1 administrative fee is not charged for transactions made through the mail.


Class C Driver License


A Class C driver license permits a person to drive:



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Class C and M Driver License

Class C Driver License (Continued)


A Class C driver license does not permit a person to drive a motorcycle or moped.


Minimum Age / Fee* / Expiration - 18 or older (Applicants 18 to 24 are required to successfully complete an approved driver education course.) / $24 for license + $1 fee = $25 / Six years 16 with completion of an approved driver education course / $15 for license + $1 fee = $16 / On applicant’s 18th birthday.


A $1 administrative fee is included in most fees. However, if you are completing multiple transactions at the same time either in-person or online then you will only be charged the $1 administrative fee once. A $1 administrative fee is not charged for transactions made through the mail.


Class M Driver License


A Class M driver license permits a person to drive a motorcycle or moped. For more information on a Class M driver license, visit www.dps.texas.gov.


Minimum Age:



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Minimum Age (Continued):


Moped: 15 with parental permission, and completion of the classroom phase of a driver education course (32hours) and a DPS-approved motorcycle operator training course (16 hours).


Motor-driven cycle of 250 cc or less: 15 with DPS approval for a minor restricted driver license (MRDL) or completion of the classroom phase of a driver education course (32 hours) and a DPS-approved basic motor- cycle operator training course (16 hours).


A restriction or endorsement may be placed on your license. The purpose of this is to improve the safety of your driving and the safety of others with whom you share the road. When this occurs, a code letter is stamped on the license that describes the type of restriction you are bound to.

The Texas Handbook describes these restrictions and endorsement codes as follows:


Restriction Code



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Restriction Code/Endorsement Code/Suspensions and Revocations

Restriction Code (Continued)


Endorsement Code


C - Suspensions and Revocations


Contrary to what many people think, operating a motor vehicle is not a right, but a privilege. If this privilege is abused, you could lose your driver license, or at a minimum incur a suspension or revocation. A suspension is defined as a temporary withdrawal of license or privilege for a finite period of time. A revocation is a termination of a license or privilege for an indefinite period of time. A revocation can be restored if all requirements for the revocation have been satisfied.


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Mandatory Suspensions

C - Suspensions and Revocations (Continued)


Certain convictions will result in the automatic suspension of your driving privilege. The Texas Driver Handbook describes these mandatory or administration suspensions in detail:


Mandatory Suspensions


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Administrative Suspensions

Administrative Suspensions



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Administrative Suspensions (Continued)


In addition, if you are under 21 years of age, you will obtain an automatic suspension of driving privilege if you fail to comply with any of the following:



Under the Texas Zero tolerance Law, a minor cannot purchase, attempt to purchase, consume, or have in his or her possession an alcoholic beverage. The penalty for such actions is:


1st NON-DRIVING Alcohol-Related Offense by a Minor - Class C misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of up to $500.00, 8 to 12 hours of community service, and mandatory attendance of an alcohol awareness course. The minor’s driver license will be suspended (or his/her privilege denied if not licensed) for 30 days.


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Zero Tolerance Law (Continued)


2nd NON-DRIVING Alcohol-Related Offense by a Minor - Class C misdemeanor, punishable by a fine up to $500.00, 20 to 40 hours of community service, and may be required to attend an alcohol awareness course. The minor’s driver license will be suspended (or his/her driving privilege denied if not licensed) for 60 days.


3rd NON-DRIVING Alcohol-Related Offense by a Minor - (17 years of age or older but less than 21)—Class B misdemeanor punishable by a fine of not less than $250.00 nor more than $2,000.00, not less than 20 nor more than 40 hours of community service, and/or confinement in jail not to exceed 180 days. The minor’s driver license will be suspended (or his/her privilege denied if not licensed) for 180 days. Minors are not eligible for deferred disposition on the third and subsequent convictions.

Beginning September 1, 1999, a minor who is convicted of driving while his/her license is suspended because of a non-driving alcohol related offense is subject to the penalties of Driving While License Invalid.

Penalties for Driving Without a License

During a stop, a law enforcement officer will determine if you have a valid driver license as required.


Restrictions or Endorsements Placed on a License


A restriction and/or endorsement may be placed on your license. This is not meant to interfere with your driving but to make you a better driver. For a complete list of codes, visit the DPS website at dps.texas.gov.


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Driving Without a License

Restrictions or Endorsements Placed on a License (Continued)


Beginning September 1, 1999, a minor who is convicted of driving while his/her license is suspended because of a non-driving alcohol related offense is subject to the penalties of Driving While License Invalid.


Penalties for Driving Without a License


Conviction Penalty*


  • 1st conviction A fine of up to $200.

  • 2nd conviction in one year A fine of $25 to $200.

  • 3rd conviction in one year after second conviction A fine of $25 to $500 and/or 72 hours to 6 months in jail.

Driving without a license, operating a vehicle without insurance at the time of the offense, and driver causes a crash resulting in serious bodily injury or death Class A misdemeanor punishable by a fine up to $4,000 and/or confinement in jail for not more than 365 days.


*Additional suspensions and surcharges may apply.


Renewing a License


A renewal notice invitation may be mailed to you about six weeks before your license expires. The notice will be mailed to the last address you provided to DPS. If you do not receive this notice, it is up to you to renew your license.


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Renewing a License (Continued)


Application for Renewal


An application for renewal must normally be made in person at any driver license office but you may be eligible to renew online at www.dps.texas.gov, by mail, or by phone at 1-866-DL-RENEW. To check your eligibility to renew, visit them online or call the number provided.

D - Inspection and Registration


Texas law requires that all vehicles be kept in the best possible condition. The state inspection program was put into place to ensure that Texas vehicles on the roadways are in safe working order. Vehicles registered in Texas, including motorcycles, scooters, and mopeds must be inspected each year by a motor vehicle inspection station. When you go in for the inspection, be sure to bring evidence of financial responsibility (insurance). You cannot be issued an inspection certificate without it.


After you obtain the certificate, place it on the vehicle’s windshield. Motorcycles and mopeds should have the inspection certificate displayed near the rear license plate. These certificates are normally good for one year from the time of the inspection. If your vehicle is involved in a collision, you may need to get it re-evaluated after repairs.


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D - Inspection and Registration (Continued)


Emission testing is also required for all vehicles from 2 to 24 years old that are powered by gasoline and registered in or required to be registered in and primarily operated in a designated county. Designated counties include Dallas, Tarrant, Denton, Collin, Ellis, Johnson, Kaufman, Parker, Rockwall, Harris, Fort Bend, Brazoria, Galveston, Montgomery, El Paso, Travis, and Williamson counties.


Required Equipment - You must have the following equipment in proper working order for your car to be considered safe:


Brakes


Foot Brake - must stop car within a distance of 25 feet at a speed of 20 miles per hour.


Parking Brake - should be adequate to stop and hold car.


Lights


Two Headlights - one on each side on the front - a beam indicator showing when the high headlight beam is on.


Tail Lights - all vehicles shall be equipped with two tail lights, except that models manufactured prior to model year 1960 shall be required to have only one tail light.


Brake Lights - all vehicles shall be equipped with two brake lights (stop lights) except that models manufactured prior to model year 1960 shall be required to have only one brake light (stop light).


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Required Equipment (Continued)


Lights


License Plate Light - a white light lighting the rear license plate when the headlights (or auxiliary lamps) are lighted.


Parking Lights - white or amber on the front, red to the rear (may be in combination with other lights).


Turn Signals - every motor vehicle, trailer, semi-trailer, and pole-trailer shall be equipped with electric turn signals (motorcycles and certain trailers excepted), except that passenger cars and trucks less than 80 inches in width and manufactured prior to model year 1960 need not be equipped with electrical turn signals.


Reflectors - two red reflectors, one on each side of car. (May be in combination with tail lights)—placed at a height of 15 to 60 inches and visible up to 600 feet. Reflectors must be visible up to 350 feet on vehicles manufactured prior to the year model 1960.


Horn - must be heard for a distance of 200 feet.


Muffler - a muffler and exhaust system - all 1968 or later models must be equipped with an exhaust emission system to help reduce air pollution.


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Required Equipment (Continued)


Safety Glass - all new cars must be equipped with safety glass. All replacements of glass for any car must be with safety glass.


License Plates - must have one valid plate at the front and one at the rear of passenger and commercial vehicles except dealer plates and those commercial vehicles that are only issued one license plate.


Windshield Wiper - for safety in bad weather.


Rearview Mirror - shall be so located as to be able to reflect a view of the highway for a distance of at least 200 feet to the rear of the vehicle.


Slow-Moving Vehicle Emblem - farm tractors and machinery, road construction machinery, animal-drawn vehicles and certain other motor vehicles designed to travel at 25 miles per hour or less must display the slow moving vehicle emblem.


Front Seat Belts - are required equipment if seat belt anchorages were part of the original equipment of the automobile.
Tires—all vehicles are required to be equipped with tires that are in proper and safe condition with a minimum tread depth of 2/32nds of an inch.


Fuel Cap - the fuel cap on gasoline-powered vehicles from 2 to 24 years old will be checked to determine if the fuel cap is missing or defective. (EXCEPTIONS: antique vehicles, circus vehicles, slow moving vehicles, motorcycles, and vehicles operated exclusively by a fuel other than gasoline and vehicles newer than 2 years or older than 24 years.)


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Equipment You Must Not Have


The following equipment is considered unsafe and is not allowed on your vehicle:



You may lawfully allow an object to extend beyond the left fender of your car a maximum of 3 inches.


Vehicle Registration


New residents in the state of Texas who wish to operate a motor vehicle must obtain a new Texas vehicle inspection certificate by a state-approved vehicle inspection station. In addition, the vehicle identification number must be verified. The motorist must also provide evidence of financial responsibility (insurance) for the vehicle in question. Before the new resident obtains a Texas driver license, he or she must register every vehicle that they own. When applying for the driver’s license, you will be required to show your registration receipt that was issued by the county tax assessor for each vehicle.


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E - Reducing Risks


The Safety Responsibility Act was enacted to ensure all drivers are financially responsible for the death, injury, or property damage they may cause while operating a motor vehicle. All owners and/or operators of motor vehicles in Texas must have at least the minimum amount of liability insurance.



In order to comply with the Safety Responsibility Act, a driver, unless exempt, must maintain liability insurance or be self insured under the provisions of the Act. Evidence of financial responsibility must be presented to the proper authorities at the time a person applies for a driver license, registers a motor vehicle, or obtains a motor vehicle inspection certificate.

Every owner and/or operator of a motor vehicle in Texas is required, as a condition of driving, to furnish upon request, evidence of financial responsibility to a law enforcement officer or to another person involved in a crash. The following list includes what is acceptable proof of financial responsibility.



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